Is online dating still taboo

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In Chinese culture unmarried women in their late twenties and beyond are labeled “leftover women” or 剩女.

Sick of unsuccessful blind dates set up by her parents and unable to stand the social scrutiny of meeting potential dates at bars in her city, Zhou registered on Jiayuan, a Chinese dating website.

For a generation that is busier than ever before, more lonely and isolated than ever before, and more reliant on the Internet than ever before, it is easier to seek companionship in the digital realm.

Not only do dating applications provide a sense of privacy, it gives people, especially to women, the ability to exercise a certain amount of agency in picking and choosing who to meet in real life.

The site is typically used by young singles between 24 and 35 and is commonly viewed as a tool for seeking long-term relationships and possibly marriage.

She found that it was not only easy to use and fit the pace of her busy professional life, but it also expanded her dating pool beyond local men in her city to access potential partners of better quality from other regions.

One of the things that the smartphone has done for young Indians is increase the amount of privacy they have in their social circles.Compatibility expert James Houran, says, “American culture emphasizes individuality whereas Chinese culture places more importance on the community as a collective.Put more simply, an American asks, ‘How does my heart feel?Before 1950, many marriages were arranged by parents who followed the rule of “matching doors and parallel windows,” or 成家立业 -- that is to get married, have children and please their families.In that setting, marriage bonds were established based on filial piety, rather than love.

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