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So it is with a heavy heart that I say I believe that, in most cases, it is probably a mistake for people with learning disabilities to marry and have children.

Every case and every person is different, of course, and in an ideal world everyone with LDs would have enough good and wise care workers to help them through all their choices in life.

One of Emma’s concerns is that she would not be able to cope with babies, although a care worker points out that getting married need not mean having children.

Even sadder than the fading of the couple’s dreams was, to me, Emma’s constant reflection on her predicament as someone with Down’s and on the limitations that she feels, which we, the viewers, come to understand a little.

If you are a single parent of a child that has a disability of some kind you may find that the challenges are even more severe and that you may even feel overwhelmed at times.

Even if money were no object, there is still the problem, with parents with LDs, of their children’s development.

There is a growing body of evidence (across the entire population) that children whose homes are talk-poor, whose parents can’t or don’t communicate with them well and who can’t make careful plans and boundaries for them or help them with schoolwork, are children brought up to serious distress and exclusion.

She is usually on my mind and never more so than last Thursday, when BBC2 transmitted a documentary called Emma and Ben, about a young couple with Down’s syndrome who are deciding whether or not to get married.

In the end, despite their obvious love and tenderness for each other, they decide against marriage, but they go through a lot of anguish along the way.

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